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Protecting Natural Habitat

IMBA trailbuilders used painstaking care to protect salmon and Spotted Owl habitats while building a new trail in Northern California's spectacular King Range.
IMBA trailbuilders used painstaking care to protect salmon and Spotted Owl habitats while building a new trail on BLM land in Northern California's spectacular King Range.

This report was made possible by a grant from Shimano.

Quietly pedaling along a narrow trail, a mountain biker is treated to an amazing perspective on the natural world. On smooth sections of trail, her eyes might wander to the horizon, or the forest canopy flashing overhead. Her focus tightens when the trail turns rocky and challenging, then expands outwards again. Mountain biking engages the senses and creates a connection with the landscape - an intimate experience that IMBA and its affiliated clubs are committed to protecting by encouraging environmentally sound trailbuilding practices.

All trail users - hikers, bikers and equestrians - affect the trail surface and the surrounding environment. Current research suggests that the impacts of mountain biking are quite similar to those of hiking. If a trail is properly located and constructed, it can handle a variety of users with minimal impact to the natural world. For that reason, IMBA has developed extensive materials that promote sustainable trail construction and design.

See the menu at the right of this page for links to case studies and success stories.

 

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